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Ford Receives 'Man of the Year'

By Brendan H. Gibbon

The Hasty Pudding Theatricals honored actor Harrison Ford as their "Man of the Year" last night before a crowd of 400 at the black-tie premiere of the Pudding's show "Morocco 'Round the Clock."

While the band played theme songs from Ford's Indiana Jones and Star Wars trilogies, co-producers of the show Matthew B. Colangelo '96 and Ravi S. Kamath '97 celebrated Ford's achievements in film with the 30th annual presentation of the "Pudding Pot."

Ford received a standing ovation from the crowd as he entered the theater and took his seat among the audience.

Before inviting Ford onto the stage, Colangelo and Kamath praised some of his lesser-known roles as "Colonel Barnsby" and "The Bellboy" in two obscure films. They then introduced him with a series of puns citing some of his better-known movies.

"We really ought to give him some kind of chance to defend himself before we brand him a fugitive," said Colangelo, alluding to one of Ford's most popular films.

Colangelo and Kamath asked to have their picture taken--by Ford himself, who snapped a few shots of the co-producers as they posed.

"My only regret is that my parents can't see me now," Colangelo said.

They then brought out a cardboard cutout of Hans Solo, Ford's character in Star Wars, to compete in a skills contest with Ford for the Pot.

"It is not every day we get to stand on the same stage as Hans Solo," Colangelo said, asking Ford to take a few more pictures of the producers standing with their one-dimensional guest.

Colangelo and Kamath had the cardboard Hans Solo translate "Wookie," the language of Solo's friend Chewbacca, with the help of lines from Star Wars over the loudspeakers. They then asked Ford to do the same.

"I've forgotten a great deal of what I used to know," said Ford, who was declared the winner of the contest anyway.

Kamath still wanted to test Ford's merit for the Pot, however. Brining out a go-cart, he asked Ford to reprise his role as a drag racer in the movie American Graffiti.

"But we have a somewhat unconventional definition of the term drag racing," said Colangelo, as two male Pudding actors dressed in high heels, wigs and dresses adorned Ford with a Medusa-like snake wig and a gaudy brassiere.

Ford adjusted the bra, got into the go-cart and pedaled across the stage.

Still unsatisfied with Ford's performance, Colangelo and Kamath conducted a third and final contest to determine whether Ford truly deserved the pot.

Alluding to a scene from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade in which Indy must choose the real Holy Grail, Colangelo brought out two Pudding Pots, one of which was the real Pot and the other a clever imitation--a food processor.

Ford hesitated, then, with the guidance of Colangelo, chose the real Pot and held it aloft as the crowd cheered.

"I'm beside myself," said Ford, bowing his snake--covered head to the crowd. "Let the fun begin."

Ford watched the first half of "Morocco" and then answered ques- tions from reporters at a press conference at the Pudding.

Asked about everything from the struggles of parenthood to what kind of wood he would use to carve a likeness of his favorite movie character, Ford seemed tired and overwhelmed by the events of the evening but answered reporters' questions patiently.

"I didn't know what to expect," said Ford of the presentation. When asked whether it was embarrassing or comical, Ford replied that it was "somewhere in between."

Ford said he thought "Morocco" was fabulous and praised the "magnificent talent of the cast."

He added that he himself decided to be an actor during college because he like the "adventure" that acting offered.

Ford is presently working on a film called Devil's Own, co-starring Brad Pitt and directed by Alan J. Pakula, who also directed Ford in Presumed Innocent. He was an Academy Award nominee for best actor for his role in the movie Witness, and has also starred in the films Blade Runner, Patriot Games, The Fugitive and Clear and Present Danger. This year he played the male lead in a remake of the 1954 classic Sabrina.

And will we see any more of Indy? "There's a potential for a fourth [Indiana Jones]" Ford said

Asked about everything from the struggles of parenthood to what kind of wood he would use to carve a likeness of his favorite movie character, Ford seemed tired and overwhelmed by the events of the evening but answered reporters' questions patiently.

"I didn't know what to expect," said Ford of the presentation. When asked whether it was embarrassing or comical, Ford replied that it was "somewhere in between."

Ford said he thought "Morocco" was fabulous and praised the "magnificent talent of the cast."

He added that he himself decided to be an actor during college because he like the "adventure" that acting offered.

Ford is presently working on a film called Devil's Own, co-starring Brad Pitt and directed by Alan J. Pakula, who also directed Ford in Presumed Innocent. He was an Academy Award nominee for best actor for his role in the movie Witness, and has also starred in the films Blade Runner, Patriot Games, The Fugitive and Clear and Present Danger. This year he played the male lead in a remake of the 1954 classic Sabrina.

And will we see any more of Indy? "There's a potential for a fourth [Indiana Jones]" Ford said

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