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Heart Spring Mountain
Books

'Heart Spring Mountain:' Slow, Short, and Sincere

The story slowly weaves through several generations of the same family, exposing how the past influences the present. Although MacArthur has written a narrative filled with compelling reflections on the past’s impact and global warming’s repercussions, the present plot offers very little action. This is a novel more focused on thought than experience.

"Cat Person"
Books

‘Cat Person’ Should Make You Uncomfortable

Fiction is supposed to identify what makes us human.

When a Man Falls cover
Books

'What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky' Balances the Weight of the World and the Lightness of Being

​In the last story of her debut collection “What It Means When a Man Falls From the Sky,” Lesley Nneke Arimah writes: “Girls with fire in their bellies will be forced to drink from a well of correction till the flames die out.” Arimah’s stories are full of such girls at every stage of life, who possess every type of fire.

Into the water cover
Books

'Into the Water' Is A Diluted Thriller

The curse of the sophomore slump holds true for Hawkins, as “Into the Water” falls short as a disappointing follow-up to “Girl on the Train.”​

Marlena cover
Books

‘Marlena’ A Strong Warning For Teens

“Marlena”’s painful story works because it is also brutally honest. It successfully scares off teens who are tempted by drugs and alcohol but does not feel preachy because Buntin never tells her readers to avoid this lifestyle.

Khizr Khan
Books

Khizr Khan Discusses ‘An American Family’ at First Parish Church

A skilled raconteur, Khan captivated event-goers with reflections on his early reverence of the United States, the events leading up to his famed speech, and the upstanding character of his late son Captain Humayun Khan.

Can't Kill Us cover
Books

‘They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us’ Blends Art And Life

To share every quote from “They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us” that is enticingly beautiful or haunting would be to write no review at all, but rather to print an abridged serving of words from Hanif Abdurraqib’s first collection of essays. The spoken word poet’s pieces are deep, uncensored analyses of topics ranging from music to death, from culture to sports, saturated with the weight of his memories and experiences.

The Time of Mutant Swans
Books

The Time of Mutant Swans

Graduate students take turns previewing Ece Temelkuran's new novel during her book talk Tuesday afternoon.

Baldwin Book Signing
Books

Baldwin Book Signing

Actor Alec R. Baldwin and author Kurt B. Andersen ‘76 sign copies of their recently released novel You Can’t Spell America Without Me at Harvard Book Store Monday evening. The parodic memoir satirizes President Donald J. Trump’s first year in office.

heather, the totality cover
Books

‘Heather, The Totality,’ a Gripping Noir Bildungsroman

Everyone in “Heather” is governed by the same primality; everyone pulsates with the same hunger. The only remaining question is which hunger will prove stronger—and, as Weiner concludes his strange and compelling debut, the ending feels exactly as it should be. Weiner’s answer is definitive. The result is “Heather, the Totality,” in its totality: a noir bildungsroman with a statement to make about class, objectification, and what it means to grow up.

Uncommon Type cover
Books

Uncommon Type cover

Mean cover
Books

Mean cover

Mean cover
Books

‘Mean:’ A Memoir of Touch

The memoir examines themes of gender, race, and sexual assault in a way so accessible and raw that it challenges us to see each of the three not as distant concepts, but as tangible realities. Each story, each memory, reaches out and touches us. “Mean” is, more than anything, a memoir of touch.

Uncommon Type cover
Books

‘Uncommon Type’ Treads Familiar Ground

“Uncommon Type” is almost surreal in its total escapism. Hanks creates a world anyone would want to live in—and one that is a far cry from the real thing.

Books

The 9th Annual Boston Book Festival Celebrates Writers and Readers

The event celebrated reading, writing, and other less traditional forms of literature. The festival was reminiscent of an amusement park—especially for those who enjoy reading and writing—enlivening Copley Square in a welcoming, warm, and exciting way.

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