Conversations

On the Lookout: Securitas

Oliverio says he can easily tell when a student has had a rough week. Spotting differences in moods and mannerisms is how he’s able to keep a lookout for the welfare of his “kids—I call them kids,” he says. “Sometimes they get offended when I call them that.”

Conversations

Eyes On The Crown

In offstage and onstage interviews, Vuong brandishes her knowledge of current events and promotes her platform: empowering homeless youth. For the talent portion of the pageant, she plays classical music—often Chopin—on the piano. For the “swim” and “evening” categories, she models the requisite attire while walking in a figure-eight shape onstage.

Conversations

Moderating Harvard Memes

Most meme groups are anonymous—save for a few friends in any given group, they’re populated by strangers who don’t know each other beyond a profile picture or an “about” page. With the Tweens group, the rule is reversed: Most members go to the same school, live on the same campus, and know each other, or at least know of each other, in real life.

Conversations

Visions of Feminism

While “Hear Her Harvard” was ostensibly all about women at Harvard, it raised questions about the legitimacy and inclusivity of the supporting organizations’ feminism.

Conversations

Inclusivity in Fashion: How Harvard’s Next Top Model is Different from America’s

“Especially with fashion, it’s kind of a complicated issue because it is an industry and an art form where forever there’s only been one vision of beauty,” Tyler J. Frances ’18, Co-Creative Director and Executive Producer of Identities, says. “I think that a mission we’re trying to bring to campus is that beauty comes in endless forms, and I think that in the past maybe [Identities] hasn’t portrayed that as enthusiastically as [it] should have.”