Government


Assistant U.S. Health Secretary Rachel L. Levine ’79 Discusses Pandemic-Fueled Public Health Challenges

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services assistant health secretary Rachel L. Levine ’79 discussed public health challenges in the age of a pandemic at a forum event hosted by the Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics on Tuesday evening.


Shelly Lowe

Harvard University Native American Program Executive Director Shelly C. Lowe was nominated by President Joe Biden Tuesday to serve as Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. If confirmed, she will be the first Native American to serve in the role.


Davis Center Georgian Studies

The Davis Center, located in the CGIS South building, announced the launch of the new Georgian Studies program this Wednesday. The program will include courses in history, social studies, and the Georgian Language.


Experts Unpack 'Democracy in Peril' at HLS Event

The online conversation, which was moderated by Harvard Law School professor Nicholas O. “Nick” Stephanopoulos, drew a comparison of the Law School’s efforts to emphasize voter engagement and the deepening crisis of American democracy.


Launching Gubernatorial Bid, Harvard Prof. Danielle Allen Pledges To ‘Reimagine’ the Commonwealth

With the Massachusetts State House behind her, Harvard Government professor Danielle S. Allen officially launched her 2022 campaign for Massachusetts governor as a Democratic candidate at an event on Boston Common Tuesday morning.


Yo-Yo Ma ’76 Talks Art’s Personal and Global Role at Arts First Event

Cellist Yo-Yo Ma ’76 joined six Harvard students to discuss the importance of art in bridging various personal and global gaps in a virtual event on Monday as part of this year's virtual ARTS FIRST festival, hosted by Harvard’s Office of the Arts.


White House National Climate Advisor and Activists Address Student Climate Conference

The deputy White House climate advisor discussed how the Biden administration will tackle climate change during one of the administration's first speaking engagements on climate change this year in a webinar hosted by the Student Climate Conference at Harvard.


Government Department Apologizes to Domínguez Victims, Shares ‘Sorrow and Shame’

The entire faculty of Harvard’s Government department issued a public apology March 9 to the women who were harassed by former Government professor Jorge I. Domínguez, who rose in departmental and University leadership despite accusations of sexual misconduct spanning four decades.


Political Scholars Analyze Trump’s Legacy on Global Populism

The Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies gathered three political scholars Thursday to discuss the effects of Donald Trump’s defeat in the 2020 United States presidential election on global populism.


Oyun-Erdene Luvsannamsrai, Recent Kennedy School Graduate, Appointed Mongolian Prime Minister

Oyun-Erdene Luvsannamsrai, a recent Kennedy School alum, ascended to the post of Prime Minister of Mongolia on Jan. 27 following his predecessor’s resignation in response to protests over the country’s Covid-19 response.


Survivors, Advocates Respond to Domínguez External Review

Two women who were harassed by Government professor Jorge I. Domínguez said they were pleased with some aspects of the University's external review released Thursday, but feel deeper systematic changes are still needed at Harvard to protect women from harassment.


Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies Launches Forum to Track Rewriting of Chilean Constitution

The David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard launched an academic forum to examine the rewriting and potential adoption of a new constitution in Chile.


Economics Remains Most Popular Concentration for Class of 2023

Economics remained the most popular concentration for the Class of 2023, with 186 declared sophomores. Computer Science and Government also retained the second and third spots, with 120 and 111 declared sophomore concentrators, respectively.


Government Professor Calls on Harvard to Adopt ‘Minimum Standards’ for Affiliation Following Capitol Riots

Harvard Government professor Ryan D. Enos called on the University to adopt “minimum standards” for affiliation with Harvard that “include supporting free elections and not encouraging violence” in a letter to University President Lawrence S. Bacow on Sunday.


‘We Anticipated This’: Shorenstein Center Faculty and Researchers React to Riots on Capitol Hill

Faculty and researchers at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy said the role of digital platforms in catalyzing the pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol Wednesday exposed an acute need for media accountability.


Ten Stories That Shaped 2020

The past twelve months were a year like no other for Harvard and the world. Under the backdrop of a once-in-a-century pandemic, students took classes from all over the globe, while pushing for social change at the University and on the political stage. Here, The Crimson reviews ten stories that defined 2020 at Harvard.


Charles Murray Invitation Provokes Outrage

Government preceptor David D. Kane invited social scientist Charles A. Murray ’65 to speak to students in Government 50: “Data” in October, provoking outrage among faculty and students and rekindling debate over free speech and conservatism on campus.


Harvard Students Launch Voter Monitoring Service in Time for Georgia Senate Runoffs

Harvard students launched a tool Friday for Georgia residents to monitor their voter registration statuses ahead of next month’s contentious Senate runoff elections in the state.


Political Scientists Discuss the Role of Federalism in Combating Coronavirus at DRCLAS Webinar

Political science professors analyzed how countries with federalist systems — those that combine national and regional governance — responded to the coronavirus pandemic at an online event hosted Tuesday by Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.


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