Crimson staff writer

Fatima Mirza

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Mexican Billionaire Donates $74 Million to Broad for Disease Research

Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim Helú has donated $74 million to the Broad Institute to continue studying the genomic basis of human disease—the second gift he has given for this effort—according to an announcement made by Slim and Broad President and Director Eric S. Lander at the Broad Institute on Monday.


Harvard School of Public Health Celebrates Centennial

As part of its 100th anniversary celebration, the Harvard School of Public Health hosted the Centennial Leadership Summit on Friday, bringing together public health academics and advocates for a day of discussion.


HSPH Announces Capital Campaign Goal of $450 Million

Harvard School of Public Health has set a goal of $450 million for its subset of the University’s capital campaign, HSPH campaign co-chair Jonathan S. Lavine announced at a gala at Revere Hotel Boston Common on Thursday evening.


Scientists Re-Code Genome of E. Coli Bacterium

Scientists from Harvard and Yale came together to achieve what was once thought impossible: to fundamentally transform the identity and properties of an organism by re-coding its genome.


Professors Say Shutdown Debate Could Change Perceptions of ACA

Harvard academics in health economics and public policy suggest that the Affordable Care Act’s role in the government shutdown on Tuesday might compromise implementation of health care reform.


Study: Public, Policy Experts Disagree on Medicare

While the public-at-large is predominantly opposed to any cuts in the Medicare program, experts maintain that reducing spending is crucial to balancing the federal budget, the Harvard Opinion Research Program study says.


Harvard Scientists Build Sound-Producing Artificial Muscle

The speaker, made of rubber membrane sandwiched between layers of gel, uses electrical charges carried by ions, not electrons, to produce sounds.


Harvard Geneticists React to Supreme Court’s Gene Patent Ruling

While many in the scientific community lauded the Supreme Court’s ruling that naturally occurring human genes may not be patented, several geneticists at Harvard Medical School on Friday said they believe the decision warrants a more lukewarm response.