Front Feature


In Massive Security Oversight, Thousands of Private University Documents Left Vulnerable

A widespread security oversight left at least tens of thousands of Harvard’s administrative files — including sensitive and confidential information on University governance — available for anyone with Harvard credentials to view, edit, download, and share.


Harvard Corporation Members Donated Big to Democrats in 2020 Elections

More than 100 candidates running for federal office in 2020 benefited from the financial support of members of the Harvard Corporation — the University’s highest governing body, which includes some of the country’s top finance executives, academics, and corporate lawyers.


Harvard Saw Decrease in Total Crimes and Sexual Assaults, Increase in Burglaries During 2020

The total number of reported crimes in 2020 was 178, down from the 220 total crimes reported in 2019. On-campus crimes also saw a 14 percent decrease in 2020 — when college students were sent home in March, and only freshmen were invited to live back on campus in the fall.


‘We Are a Complete Outlier’: HBS Moves Some Classes Online Amid Covid-19 Outbreak

In an email to all MBA students on Thursday, four HBS administrators wrote that the school has counted 121 cases among MBA students since July 1, with close to 60 students in isolation that day. First-year students made up roughly 75 percent of those positive cases.


‘An Uphill Climb’: Square Businesses Grapple with Staffing Shortages

Amid a national shortage in restaurant workers, Harvard Square businesses have been inundated with customers, causing stores to reduce their hours and discontinue online ordering as lines stretch out of their doors.


Bacow Insists Harvard’s Move to End Fossil Fuel Investments is ‘Consistent’ with Past Positions

When University President Lawrence S. Bacow said earlier this month that Harvard would move to end its investments in the fossil fuel industry, the activists who had been pushing him to do so for years celebrated the news as a seismic shift.


Harvard Sues Insurer to Recoup Legal Fees After Admissions Lawsuit Exceeds $25 Million

After racking up more than $25 million in legal fees defending its admissions practices against anti-affirmative action group Students for Fair Admissions, Harvard filed suit against its excess insurance company Friday for allegedly refusing to cover legal fees in the ongoing SFFA case.


Penny Pritzker ’81 Donates $100 Million for New Economics Department Building

Former U.S. Secretary of Commerce and business leader Penny S. Pritzker ’81 donated $100 million to the Economics Department to support the construction of a new department building, Harvard announced Tuesday morning.


Undergrads Overwhelmingly Back Shopping Week Referendum, Elect 48 to Undergraduate Council

Harvard College students voted overwhelmingly in favor of a referendum on shopping week and elected 48 students to the Undergraduate Council with high voter turnout, the UC Election Commission announced Friday afternoon.


HUPD Arresting Black People at Disproportionate Rate, New Data Shows

The Harvard University Police Department has been arresting Black people at a disproportionate rate compared to the general population over the last three years, according to data from the department’s new workload and crime dashboard.


Students Weigh Return to Campus Social Life As Pandemic Rages On

While some students said they are eager to have the social life they envisioned before the pandemic’s onset, others are treading carefully, according to interviews with more than a dozen undergraduates.


Two Years, Two Votes: Harvard Student Workers Go to Polls in Strike Authorization Vote

For the second time in two years, members of Harvard’s graduate student union went to the polls Monday — both online and in-person — to decide whether to authorize their Bargaining Committee to call for a strike.


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