Supreme Court


Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor Presides Over Ames Moot Court Final at Harvard Law School

Harvard Law School students convened before United States Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Nov. 15 to argue a mock appellate case on administrative law for the finals of the school’s annual Ames Moot Court Competition.


Harvard FAS Dean Hoekstra Says Eliminating Legacy Admissions ‘Under Consideration’

Removing legacy admissions preferences in Harvard’s admissions process “is one of the things that’s under consideration,” Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Hopi E. Hoekstra said in an interview with The Crimson last week.


In Washington, Democrats and Republicans Take Aim at Harvard Admissions

College admissions has long been the battleground in the ongoing war over the future of higher education, and Harvard has faced nationwide scrutiny over its admissions practices for the last decade. After the Supreme Court ruled to end affirmative action this summer, Harvard is once again caught in the crossfire.


Hundreds of Affiliates Sign Petition Calling on Harvard to Better Support Black Students After Swatting Attack, Supreme Court Ruling

More than 400 Harvard affiliates have signed onto a petition demanding University administrators take steps to better support Black students, citing last semester’s swatting attack against four Black students and the Supreme Court decision striking down race-conscious admissions.


A Month After the Fall of Affirmative Action, How Can Colleges Uphold Diversity?

After Supreme Court’s decision on June 29 effectively ended race-conscious admissions, universities and colleges rushed to reaffirm their commitments to ensuring student body diversity. But their statements left an important question unanswered: How?


Justice Thomas Aide Received Venmo Payments from Anti-Affirmative Action Lawyers in 2019, Sparking Ethics Questions

Attorneys Patrick Strawbridge and William S. Consovoy — who successfully litigated an effort to effectively strike down affirmative action — made Venmo payments to a then-legal aide for Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, the Guardian reported last week.


Ivy League, Other Peer Schools Pledge to Uphold Diversity While Complying With Supreme Court Ruling

In a show of solidarity, Harvard’s peer institutions rallied to the defense of race-conscious admissions within hours of the Supreme Court decision declaring Harvard’s and the University of North Carolina’s admissions programs unconstitutional.


AFFIRMATIVE ACTION FALLS

The Supreme Court effectively struck down race-conscious admissions policies in higher education in a landmark ruling against Harvard Thursday. In this special edition, The Crimson examines the decision, how students and faculty are responding, and its impact on higher education and beyond.


‘A Gut Punch’: Harvard Students Condemn Supreme Court Decision Striking Down Affirmative Action

Harvard students widely condemned the Supreme Court’s decision on Thursday to sharply restrict the consideration of race in college admissions, expressing fear and sadness that the ruling is likely to reduce racial diversity at the school.


Supreme Court Strikes Down Affirmative Action

The Supreme Court severely curtailed affirmative action in higher education admissions, declaring Harvard's race-conscious admissions policy unconstitutional in a ruling against the school Thursday.


Deep Within the Anti-Affirmative Action Lawsuit, a Holocaust Denier

“Nobody in the media has been willing to point out the fact that my research was the basis of the lawsuit now before the Supreme Court," Ron K. Unz ’83, the controversial conservative activist cited in the Students for Fair Admissions’ lawsuit against Harvard, said.


As Supreme Court Affirmative Action Ruling Looms, Top Harvard Dean Still Unannounced

Days before Faculty of Arts and Sciences Dean Claudine Gay ascends to the Harvard presidency — as the Supreme Court appears on the verge of striking down the school’s race-conscious admissions policies — the University’s largest academic school still doesn’t know who its next leader will be.


As Seniors Graduate Into Post-Dobbs World, Harvard’s Class of 1973 Recalls Landmark Legalization of Abortion

On Jan. 22, 1973, the Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, guaranteeing the right to an abortion nationwide and reversing all state laws — including in Massachusetts — that completely banned the procedure.


Harvard Law School Professor Critiques Judicial Supremacy at Inaugural Lecture

Harvard Law School professor Daphna Renan gave a critique of judicial supremacy — the idea that the Supreme Court is the final authority on the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution — at an event on Thursday.


William Consovoy, Attorney Who Represented Students for Fair Admissions, Dies at 48

William S. Consovoy, an attorney who was a prominent face for conservative causes, died on Monday evening, his law firm Consovoy McCarthy announced on Tuesday. He was 48.


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