Admissions


Ten Stories That Shaped 2023

In 2023, Harvard had a tumultuous year. Claudine Gay’s first semester ended amid a leadership crisis as she came under fire for her response to tensions on a campus divided by the Israel-Hamas war and faced allegations of plagiarism. Harvard’s legacy and donor preferences in admissions also faced national scrutiny following the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling striking down the University’s affirmative action policy. Across campus, scandal after scandal hit parts of the University. Here, The Crimson looks back at the 10 stories that shaped 2023 at Harvard.


‘Politically Motivated’: Experts Weigh in on Harvard Decision to Not Report Racial Composition of Early Action Admits

Harvard did not report the racial and ethnic composition of students admitted in the early application cycle for the Class of 2028, a move seen by experts as an attempt by the University to avoid potential litigation from anti-affirmative action groups.


After Covid-19 Recovery, Harvard College Sees Rise in International Enrollment for Third Straight Year

Harvard College saw an increase in enrolled international students for the third year in a row, with demographic data from the enrolled Class of 2027 indicating a 32 percent increase in the share of international students compared to the Class of 2024.


Class of 2027 By the Numbers

Each fall, The Crimson surveys freshmen about their backgrounds, academic aspirations, and lifestyles. In this year’s installation, The Crimson also asked students for their views on artificial intelligence and admissions. Scroll through the interactive graphs and charts on the following pages for a visual representation of the Class of 2027.


More than 60 Percent of Surveyed Harvard Freshmen Do Not Support Legacy Admissions

The first installment of a four-part series on The Crimson’s Class of 2027 survey examines students’ views on affirmative action, diversity, and legacy.


Evan Mandery ’89 Says Elite Colleges Increase Social Inequality at Harvard PBHA Talk

Evan J. Mandery ’89, a professor at the City University of New York, said that elite colleges and universities exacerbate social inequality in the United States during a talk on Monday at the Phillips Brooks House Association.


Education Experts Talk Admissions in the Wake of Supreme Court Decision at Harvard Ed School Webinar

Education experts discussed paths forward for colleges and students in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision effectively striking down affirmative action during a webinar hosted by the Harvard Graduate School of Education Wednesday.


Harvard FAS Dean Hoekstra Says Eliminating Legacy Admissions ‘Under Consideration’

Removing legacy admissions preferences in Harvard’s admissions process “is one of the things that’s under consideration,” Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Hopi E. Hoekstra said in an interview with The Crimson last week.


Harvard Tells Alumni Interviewers Not to Consider Race and Ethnicity of Class of 2028 Applicants

Following the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down affirmative action in higher education admissions, Harvard has instructed alumni interviewers to not take an applicant’s race or ethnicity into account in evaluations, according to updated guidelines obtained by The Crimson.


Could Losing Legacy Admissions Sustain Racial Diversity?

With the fall of affirmative action, some have suggested that elite universities like Harvard could maintain racial diversity by eliminating legacy admissions preferences. But questions linger over whether dismantling the practice would lead to a meaningful expansion in diversity — and whether alumni donation dollars would wither.


In Washington, Democrats and Republicans Take Aim at Harvard Admissions

College admissions has long been the battleground in the ongoing war over the future of higher education, and Harvard has faced nationwide scrutiny over its admissions practices for the last decade. After the Supreme Court ruled to end affirmative action this summer, Harvard is once again caught in the crossfire.


After Affirmative Action Falls, Students, Counselors, and Schools Seek New Roadmap for Admissions

In June, the Supreme Court effectively struck down affirmative action in higher education, finding Harvard’s race-conscious admissions practices unconstitutional — and consequently, adding complexity to the task of applying to college for the next class of high school seniors.


Harvard Overhauls College Application in Wake of Affirmative Action Decision

After the Supreme Court radically curtailed the use of race in higher education admissions, Harvard College overhauled the free-response questions on its application, eliminating the Harvard supplement optional essay and replacing it with required short answer questions.


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