Contributing writer

Jem K. Williams

Latest Content


Burning Bridges: How the Charles River Changed Economic Law

The Court’s ruling set a precedent that still has implications for economic progress and market competition today. The law still struggles with the question of what it means to value technological progress over the livelihood of one company.


Fifteen Questions: Jeannie Suk Gersen on Free Speech, Fast Fashion, and Getting Over Yourself

The Harvard Law School professor and New Yorker writer Jeannie Suk Gersen sat down with Fifteen Minutes to discuss her exploration of various aspects of the law. "For me, I can’t imagine in my career not having that sense of spontaneity and unpredictability about what it is I’m going to get super interested in next," she says.


The Life of the Party: Madison Pankey

Find her at Grendel’s on Wednesday nights, or “Grendsdays” as she enthusiastically refers to them, on Thursday nights at The Burren, an Irish pub in Somerville, and in the occasional “big functions” that pop up around campus over the weekend. But most importantly, she finds it in all the nights spent with her friends.


Broken Recovery: Eating Disorders at Harvard

From anxieties about eating in Annenberg to busy schedules to specific dietary restrictions, one of the most essential tasks of daily life — nourishing ourselves — became a recurring difficulty for all of us.


Fifteen Questions: Catherine Brekus on Historical Women, Christian Nationalism, and Religious Freedom

Divinity School professor Catherine A. Brekus ’85 sat down with Fifteen Minutes to talk about women’s history and religion. “For me, religion became a tool for asking questions about how women had made sense of their lives, and how they had made meaning,” she says.


Podcast: The Unabomber: The Man, the Myth, and the Manifesto

The Unabomber, caught in the 1990s, continues to remain a fixture in the imaginations of countless podcast hosts, documentary makers, and journalists — why? In this podcast, Fifteen Minutes Magazine breaks down the common stories used to explain his path to violence and examines the aftershocks of the publication of his manifesto.