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Crimson staff writer

Tianxing V. Lan

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3AM Cinema Club
Arts

3AM Cinema Club

3AM Cinema Excerpt

3AM Cinema Club
Columns

3AM Cinema Club: Chapter 5

And when reality became suffocating, he looked away, a gesture that, if impactless, is at least tender.

Columns

3AM Cinema Club: Chapter 4

The fluorescent lights of the harbor illuminated lonely gantry cranes in the distance. I suddenly felt like I was one of them.

 3AM Cinema Excerpt
Arts

3AM Cinema Excerpt

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3AM Cinema Club ScreenPlay Excerpt
Arts

3AM Cinema Club ScreenPlay Excerpt

Room Day Excerpt

3AM Cinema Club Screenplay Excerpt 2
Arts

3AM Cinema Club Screenplay Excerpt 2

Room Day Excerpt 2

3AM Cinema Club ScreenPlay Excerpt
Columns

3AM Cinema Club: Chapter 3

She dances gently, then it gets more and more violent. By the end she is jumping up and down, throwing herself in all directions.

tv for tv
On Campus

‘Before Projection’ Re-examines an Overlooked Art Form

The show serves as a reminder of the close relationship between artistic practice and technological advancement.

3AM Cinema Club
Columns

3AM Cinema Club: Chapter 2

Film idea: A man stops speaking, because he doesn’t know what he really wants to say and who he wants to say it to. After twenty years he breaks the silence (Why now?).

3AM Cinema Club
Columns

3AM Cinema Club: Chapter 1

I tried to meditate by imagining myself as a compact cassette.

courtesy of Philip A.N. Chowdry
Arts

Portrait of an Artist: Philip A.N. Chowdry

Philip A.N. Chowdry ’19 has produced a number of artworks that deal with current political issues, especially the presidency of Donald Trump. His recent work “The Melania,” which was on display at The Harvard Student Art Show this year, reflects the media’s portrayal of Melania Trump, and “Our Vendetta,” an ongoing series, takes the form of protest posters and have been distributed around Harvard Square. The Crimson sat down with him to discuss his inspirations and working process.

Jean-Michel Frodon
Film

In Focus: Jean-Michel Frodon

Jean-Michel Billard, better known by his Frodo Baggins-inspired penname Jean-Michel Frodon, started his career as a journalist and film critic in France in the early ’80s. Between 2003 and 2009, he was the chief editor of “Cahiers du Cinema,” the oldest film magazine in publication and one of the most influential ones in the world.

harvard-graduate-school-of-design
Visual Arts

Arts Asks: Santiago Mota

Interview with a student enrolled in Harvard's new Master in Design Engineering degree program jointly hosted by Graduate School of Design (GSD) and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

Film

From the Vaults: ‘Trainspotting’

Just as rock and roll would be lackluster without the topless teens at music festivals, “Trainspotting” owes its charm largely to the cult surrounding it. For the believers, the film is some sort of 90s proletarian manifesto thrown into the face of a stupid century: Either you dig it and dance along to “Lust for Life,” or you are spoiled bourgeois scum and to hell with your phony attitude and your dental insurance. It is counterculture at its most triumphant, and the protagonists, who are too fast to live and too young to die, are fin-de-siècle Hamlets.

Visual Arts

From the Vaults: ‘In Praise of Love’

The film starts with murmurs, and ends with the statement “Maybe nothing was said.” In between, we see a young director named Edgar auditioning actors of all age groups, from all social classes, for an ambitious—eventually failed—film project about love.

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