Highlight


Since the Harvard Kennedy School Overhauled its Financial Aid Team, Students Say Services Have Suffered

The Harvard Kennedy School restructured its admissions and financial aid teams in 2021, laying off almost all of its enrollment services staff. But the restructuring, more than a dozen students said, has often left them in the dark about the state of loans, financial aid, and other basic student services.


38 Harvard Faculty Sign Open Letter Questioning Results of Misconduct Investigations into Prof. John Comaroff

Nearly 40 Harvard faculty members signed onto an open letter this week questioning the results of misconduct investigations into John L. Comaroff, a professor of African and African American Studies and Anthropology who was placed on unpaid leave last month.


Harvard Professor’s Paper Claiming ‘Comfort Women’ in Imperial Japan Were Voluntarily Employed Stokes International Controversy

A paper by Harvard Law School Japanese legal studies professor J. Mark Ramseyer that claims sex slaves taken by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II were actually recruited, contracted sex workers generated international controversy, academic criticism, and student petitions at Harvard this week.


‘The Achilles Heel of Title IX’

Students pursuing complaints of sexual misconduct at institutions other than their own said they faced both logistical and psychological hurdles while seeking restitution through Title IX offices. Experts said such inter-institutional cases can fall through the cracks of Title IX legislation.


Harvard Dismisses Three Students from Dorms After September Indoor Party

Harvard sent home three freshmen living in Mather House last weekend after finding that they hosted a party in the house with at least three other guests last month, according to five freshmen on campus with knowledge of the matter.


The Crimson's Freshman Survey: Meet the Class of 2024

The Crimson’s survey of more than 76 percent of incoming freshmen in Harvard College’s Class of 2024 asked them about their experiences during the coronavirus pandemic and opinions of Harvard’s response to it.


Student Focus Group Instructed to Assume Harvard Will Bring Up to 40 Percent of Undergraduates Back in the Fall

Undergraduates who return to campus may have to form self-contained social “pods,” submit to regular testing, and face discipline for breaking Harvard College social distancing rules, according to students who attended focus groups this week.


Protected by Decades-Old Power Structures, Three Renowned Harvard Anthropologists Face Allegations of Sexual Harassment

Senior Anthropology professors Theodore C. Bestor, Gary Urton, and John L. Comaroff have weathered allegations of sexual harassment, including some leveled by students. But affiliates said gender issues in the department stretch beyond them.


The End of the Harvard Century

For decades, Harvard’s relationship with China has been asymmetrical — China needed the University’s talent and resources more than the University needed China’s. But in light of the country’s economic and political ascent, the balance of that relationship has begun to shift. As the U.S. adopts racialized rhetoric toward Chinese scholars and China extends its long arm of censorship to university campuses overseas, perhaps even Harvard’s prestigious walls cannot adequately defend “Veritas.”


HUPD Officer Involved In February Smith Center Arrest Criticized For Use of Force In Two Prior Incidents

Anthony T. Carvello, a Harvard University police officer who came under scrutiny last month for his use of force in an arrest at the Smith Campus Center, has also received criticism for his use of force in two other recent arrests of homeless black men at the Smith Center.


The Old Boys’ Network: Racism, Sexism, and Alleged Favoritism In Harvard’s Police Department

For the most part, Harvard affiliates know Harvard University police officers as the men and women who patrol campus events, frequent the dining halls, and help freshmen move into their dorms. Within the department’s walls, though, HUPD is divided over incidents involving female officers and officers of color, and allegations of favoritism and retaliation.


Citing Toxic Culture and Administrator Departures, Harvard School of Public Health Faculty Repeatedly Weighed Voting No Confidence in Dean

On Dec. 20, 2018, around 40 faculty filtered into the Dean’s Conference Room at the Harvard School of Public Health for an unusual discussion, without the attendance of Dean Michelle A. Williams. They would soon consider taking a dramatic action in her absence: a vote of no confidence in her leadership.


Ten Stories That Shaped 2019

Beginning with a dean's decision to represent Harvey Weinstein and ending with a graduate student strike, 2019 was an eventful year at Harvard. Students pushed for change via protests, whether they called for an ethnic studies program or for divestment. Outside news touched campus, too, as University affiliates examined Harvard's relationship to Jeffrey Epstein. Here, The Crimson reviews ten stories that defined the past twelve months on campus.


Ten Stories That Shaped the 2010s

The past decade at Harvard has been anything but boring. The University witnessed a bevy of challenges — cheating scandals and financial troubles, lawsuits and strikes. Here, The Crimson takes a look back at stories that defined Harvard over the past ten years.


The Crimson's Freshman Survey: Meet the Class of 2023

This year’s Harvard freshmen — like those who came before them — are an exceedingly well-off group relative to the country at large. More than 27 percent of members of the Class of 2023 who answered a question about parental income in a recent Crimson survey said their families make $250,000 or more per year — earnings higher than 95 percent of American households.


The Neighborhood Where Nothing Ever Changes

Should Bill Bartley have to leave the neighborhood, he will take a piece of its history with him. Yet his departure would be but one of many, part of a long, gradual erosion of the landmarks that have distinguished Harvard Square for many years. And as the face of the Square changes, small business owners have no choice but to confront a version of the neighborhood’s future that may no longer save space for them.


Fifteen Randomly Generated Seniors

From Fifteen Minutes Magazine: We always told ourselves that anyone is “interesting” if you ask the right questions. This year, we’re putting that hypothesis to the test.


The Fire That Changed The Way We Think About Grief

Hundreds lost loved ones to Boston's 1942 Cocoanut Grove fire, the deadliest nightclub conflagration in U.S. history. The blaze and its aftermath — and a Harvard professor's study of the bereaved — would reshape the way America and the world understood grief.


Meet the Five Harvard Students Who Testified in the Admissions Trial

Five Harvard undergraduates stepped up to testify in favor of affirmative action in the admissions trial this week. The Crimson breaks down who they are and where they're from — and what drove them to speak up in court.


Left Out of the System

At Harvard and at elite Boston public schools, so-called “objective” metrics used in admissions may not deserve the name. The game of who gets in where is undergirded — and, to a certain extent, predetermined — by a complex ecosystem of devoted parents, well-paid tutors, and driven students.


‘Arrogance.’ ‘Small-Town Insecurity.’ Here's Why Harvard Hesitates to Accept Some Applicants

When Megan Turner asked her high school teacher for help applying to Harvard, she hoped for a glowing letter of recommendation. What she got was a “negative” essay referencing her “‘small-town’ insecurity” that nearly sank her candidacy.


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