Editors' Choice


Pedal to the Metal at Cabot’s Quad Bikes

“Having someone walk in with a broken bike and walk out with a fixed bike — there are few things I've done at this university that have made people so instantly happy,” says Quad Bikes manager Julian K. Li ’25.


To Pay Attention

I never thought I loved Chico. But that December day as I lay curled up in my childhood bed watching the interaction between Christine and Sister Joan on my iPad, I realized that I had paid attention to it. And if I really hated it, why did I spend so much time telling other people about it?


Hacking Harvard Bridge with Oliver R. Smoot

As a pledge, the fraternity made Smoot lay down on the bridge over 300 times, painting ticks at each smoot. Almost 70 years later, the Smoot markings remain, allowing pedestrians to measure their journey in “smoots.” According to a sign on the bridge, Cambridge and Boston are exactly 364.4 smoots apart.


Up Close with Lee Smith

Smith’s enduring attachment to his time is representative of his broader artistic philosophy, one of introspection and intimacy. Part of that philosophy emerged from an encounter with the groundbreaking photojournalist Gordon Parks during his visit to the yearbook staff.


Burning Bridges: How the Charles River Changed Economic Law

The Court’s ruling set a precedent that still has implications for economic progress and market competition today. The law still struggles with the question of what it means to value technological progress over the livelihood of one company.


Most Whimsical: Jeremy Ornstein

“One of my most whimsical qualities is talking to strangers,” he says. In the summer of 2021, he walked 400 miles from New Orleans to Houston talking to strangers about climate change. “We just stopped everyone we could and talked to them — talked to a truck driver about the coastal erosion, and a guy in an excavator, and a fisherman,” he continues.


Unapologetic Selfhood with Matta Zheng

“When students come to me — many, if not all the times — they’re really suffering because they’re worried, they’re concerned, or maybe they even believe that their person is fundamentally wrong in some way,” Zheng says. “I am able, when it’s appropriate and when it works, to affirm to them in no uncertain language, in the fullest ways that I can, their full humanity, their full perfection, their full wholeness.”


Tunnel Vision

On my phone, I collected gold coins and hoverboards instead of accolades and exam scores; I traded these tokens for score boosters instead of writing mentorships. Eventually, I realized that I had sworn off one endless run only to replace it with another one.


Behind the Scenes at Boston Supper Clubs

In recent years, the Boston area has seen a flourishing of private multi-course dinners. They take a variety of forms: a pop-up in a restaurant, a meal around a table. Prices range widely, from $30 to more than $200, and the hosts run the gamut as well from amateur to professional chef.


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