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The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

WILL UNVEIL LATEST RHINOCEROS STATUES IN BIOLOGICAL LABS

GEORGE R. AGASSIZ, CHAIRMAN OF BOARD WILL OFFICIATE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Two huge bronze statues newly placed at the main entrance of the Biological Laboratories will be held tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock.

Attending the exercises will be Miss Katherine W. Lane, Boston sculptress, who made the models for Harvard; visiting committees of the Harvard Overseers to the Museum of Comparative Zoology and the Division of Biology; other members of the Harvard governing boards; and the staff of the Harvard Division of Biology and of the Museum of Comparative Zoology.

Short addresses will be made by Professor George T. Moore '95, of the University of Missouri, Director of the Missouri Botanical Garden, and Chairman of the Overseers' visiting committee of the Division of Biology; and by Alden B. Dawson, Director of the Harvard Biological Laboratories. President-emeritus A. Lawrence Lowell and George R. Agassiz '84, President of the Harvard Board of Overseers, will unveil the statues.

The rhinoceros models, among the largest life-sized bronzes of their kind made in modern times, were put in place April 24, completing the design of the Biological Laboratories, built in 1931. They have been three years in preparation by Miss Lane, who also worked out the other decorations of the building, including the frieze of animals carved in brick on the facade and the intricately fashioned metal doors.

Modelled from a female Indian rhinoceros in the Bronx Zoo, New York, each of the statues stands about six feet tall and measures over thirteen feet from horn to tail. The statues are not duplicates, having been designed and cast separately. The Indian rhinoceros, selected because it is one of the nearest modern relatives of the prehistoric dinosaurs, is larger than its African relatives and possesses primitive three-toed feet. It is nearly extinct; only about 250 are now alive.

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