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Papers Given at Two Day Meeting Of Psychologists

By Victor K. Mcelheny

Staff members and graduates of the Harvard Psychological Clinic yesterday wound up two days of meetings and reunion parties honoring the Clinic's 30th anniversary. The Clinic is a part of the Social Relations Department, and serves as headquarters for the department's clinical psychologists.

The celebration not only honored the Clinic's long career but also served as a farewell party for the yellow building on Plympton Street next to Leverett House, which the Clinic has occupied ever since its founding in 1927. Sometime next year, the Clinic will have to make way for the housewreckers clearing the way for the eighth House.

During the reunion, graduates and staff members presented a dozen papers on various psychological topics, ranging from a discussion of sex hormones and sex behavior to a review of recent attempts to clear up confusion over the definition of mental health.

Among those presenting papers were D. W. MacKinnon, Saul Rosenzweig, Nevitt Sanford, Thelma Alper, Robert Holt, M. Brewster Smith, Anthony Davids, Gardner Lindzey, Charles C. McArthur, and John Money.

The Clinic has played an important role in American psychology. Under the direction of Henry Murray '15, Professor of Clinical Psychology, much of the work of developing the Thematic Apperception Test was carried out at the Clinic. The person taking the test, which is one of the most important of "projective" psychological tests, is asked to tell a story about a series of different ambiguous pictures.

Another important type of research at the Clinic has been the study of the lives and problems of normal people. This research was conducted under Robert W. White '25, new chairman of the Social Relations department.

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