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An Olympian In Cambridge

By John B. Roberts, Crimson Staff Writer

Near the end of their sophomore season, Leverett roommates Steve Flomenhoft, Matt Mallgrave and Ted Drury had a lot to say about the next year.

Flomenhoft, referring to the imminent departure of high-scoring, Superline seniors Ted Donato, Peter Ciavaglia and Mike Vukonich, said "You won't need anyone to score 50 points next season."

Mallgrave, with a smile on his face, added, "Except maybe Teddy. How's that for a little pressure?"

Accepting The Mantle

Well, it is now almost common knowledge in the hockey world--both amateur and professional--that Teddy Drury did not return the following year for his junior season. Instead, the Trumbull, Conn. native took his graceful speed and his Charmin-soft hands to Albertville, France as a member of the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team.

Only now has Drury returned for his junior year, and how high he and the Harvard men's hockey team which he captains can reach is now being asked in earnest.

The pressure which Mallgrave mentioned two years ago is certainly a factor, but the Crimson captain smoothly accepts the expectations and deflects the accolades.

When asked about goals for this season, both for the team and personally, Drury is straightforward.

"Harvard thinks every year that it can win the national championship," Drury says. "I think we have a team that can do it. We have 20 to 25 guys who are committed to that idea."

The 6'1", 190-lbs. forward reveals less about his individual aspirations, but a quiet smile comes onto his face as he talks about a "different role."

As Harvard Coach Ronn Tomassoni explains, Drury was used as a defensive specialist with the Olympic team, getting ice time mostly as a penalty-killer, though occasionally as a "shadow" for an opposing nation's main threat.

"People overlook his two-way skills," Tomassoni says. "In the ECAC quarterfinals his sophomore year, I used him to shadow Joe Juneau [currently playing for the Boston Bruins]."

Drury was more than willing to sacrifice his offensive game once again to play in Albertville.

"The summer before, when I went to camp, I said to myself that I would do anything to make the team," the Olympian says. "Obviously, the penalty-killing, defensive specialist role is not as glamorous."

"This year it's a different role," Drury happily explains.

Why Is He Here?

While Harvard hockey fans gleefully await tonight's home opener against Union, Bruce Delventhal, the coach of the Skating Dutchmen must be blaming Friday the 13th for his ill luck.

Delventhal, like most others not directly associated with Harvard hockey, must wonder why Drury, a second-round draft pick of the NHL's Calgary Flames, returned to bedevil Harvard's ECAC opponents.

Though No. 18 suited him quite well as a member of the U.S. squad, suiting up as No. 18 for the Crimson makes Drury a certified anomaly among his Albertville teammates, most of whom are now playing as professionals.

"I was pretty sure I was coming back," Drury says. "Though I won't say I didn't have a few doubts."

Tomassoni, who has watched Hobey Baker Award winners Scott Fusco and Lane MacDonald play for Olympic teams and then return for highly successful seasons for the Crimson, was not surprised atall by Drury's decision.

"A boy that comes here is committed to gettinga good education," Tomassoni says. "Knowing Teddyand Teddy's family as I do, it was obviously veryimportant that he come back. It says an awful lotabout him as a person that he came back."

It also says a lot about his patience. EveryECAC player who made the Canadian Olympic teamalso left the league behind after Albertville,according to Tomassoni. That includes Cornell'sKent Manderville, who edged out Drury for IvyLeague Rookie of the Year in 1990.

"For me personally, it [coming back] was theright thing to do," Drury affirms. "I wassurprised that Manderville and [Cornell teammateDan] Ratuchsny did not come back. I just hope allthose guys are happy and don't have any secondthoughts."

Drury's professional ambitions, despite hiscurrent decision, are still strong. Afterfinishing at Harvard, he will hope No. 18 is stillfree in Calgary red and yellow.

"I will definitely pursue that, but the Flames[who drafted Drury out of high school] are beingpatient with me," Drury says. "Basically, when I'mready we'll get together and figure it out."

Another intriguing issue is the 1994Lillehammer Winter Games.

Though disruptive for Drury--to graduate, hewould have to take another leave of absence,extending his Harvard stay to six years, and putoff the Flames a bit longer. Of course, if the NHLdecides to send a Dream Team of its own in 1994(an option currently under discussion), the 1992Olympic veteran will not have to trouble himselfover that decision.

The College Game

Drury's return is doubly special because hewill wear the "C" on the upper left side of hisjersey. Only George Owen, back in 1922, has alsobeen the Crimson captain as an underclassman.

As the Crimson's official leader, Drury haslearned quickly the etiquette of being the star ina team sport. He knows other teams will try to"shadow" him, but points out that other playerswill make their contributions as well.

"With Steve [Flomenhoft] and Matty [Mallgrave]and [Brad] Konik and [Steve] Martins when he comesback, there is a lot of skill there," Drury says."With all those guys, and there are a lot that Idid not mention, there is not much of a problem interms of personal pressure. We're a balancedteam."

Tomassoni probably hopes this is true, but hecertainly looks to Drury as the example for thejunior's Crimson teammates.

"He was obviously a very talented young manwhen he left," Tomassoni says. "Still, he hasimproved in all phases."

"I saw him against BC, and it was obvious hewas using other players better. He's an unselfishkid, always trying to make the perfect pass.Sometimes he's got to realize he's the betteroption," Tomassoni says.

Indeed, expect the junior to focus on hisoffensive production this year. That's whereHarvard needs him most--his scoring prowess shouldbe an accurate barometer of the team's success.Drury opened this season with a pair of goalsagainst Brown, responding well to the pressurehanging on that Crimson C.

Mallgrave and Flomenhoft, beware. Maybethis year Teddy will score his 50 points.Crimson File PhotoImages of Harvard hockey's TED DRURY. Above:as captain of the 1992 Crimson. Top right: asmember of the 1992 U.S. Olympic team.

"A boy that comes here is committed to gettinga good education," Tomassoni says. "Knowing Teddyand Teddy's family as I do, it was obviously veryimportant that he come back. It says an awful lotabout him as a person that he came back."

It also says a lot about his patience. EveryECAC player who made the Canadian Olympic teamalso left the league behind after Albertville,according to Tomassoni. That includes Cornell'sKent Manderville, who edged out Drury for IvyLeague Rookie of the Year in 1990.

"For me personally, it [coming back] was theright thing to do," Drury affirms. "I wassurprised that Manderville and [Cornell teammateDan] Ratuchsny did not come back. I just hope allthose guys are happy and don't have any secondthoughts."

Drury's professional ambitions, despite hiscurrent decision, are still strong. Afterfinishing at Harvard, he will hope No. 18 is stillfree in Calgary red and yellow.

"I will definitely pursue that, but the Flames[who drafted Drury out of high school] are beingpatient with me," Drury says. "Basically, when I'mready we'll get together and figure it out."

Another intriguing issue is the 1994Lillehammer Winter Games.

Though disruptive for Drury--to graduate, hewould have to take another leave of absence,extending his Harvard stay to six years, and putoff the Flames a bit longer. Of course, if the NHLdecides to send a Dream Team of its own in 1994(an option currently under discussion), the 1992Olympic veteran will not have to trouble himselfover that decision.

The College Game

Drury's return is doubly special because hewill wear the "C" on the upper left side of hisjersey. Only George Owen, back in 1922, has alsobeen the Crimson captain as an underclassman.

As the Crimson's official leader, Drury haslearned quickly the etiquette of being the star ina team sport. He knows other teams will try to"shadow" him, but points out that other playerswill make their contributions as well.

"With Steve [Flomenhoft] and Matty [Mallgrave]and [Brad] Konik and [Steve] Martins when he comesback, there is a lot of skill there," Drury says."With all those guys, and there are a lot that Idid not mention, there is not much of a problem interms of personal pressure. We're a balancedteam."

Tomassoni probably hopes this is true, but hecertainly looks to Drury as the example for thejunior's Crimson teammates.

"He was obviously a very talented young manwhen he left," Tomassoni says. "Still, he hasimproved in all phases."

"I saw him against BC, and it was obvious hewas using other players better. He's an unselfishkid, always trying to make the perfect pass.Sometimes he's got to realize he's the betteroption," Tomassoni says.

Indeed, expect the junior to focus on hisoffensive production this year. That's whereHarvard needs him most--his scoring prowess shouldbe an accurate barometer of the team's success.Drury opened this season with a pair of goalsagainst Brown, responding well to the pressurehanging on that Crimson C.

Mallgrave and Flomenhoft, beware. Maybethis year Teddy will score his 50 points.Crimson File PhotoImages of Harvard hockey's TED DRURY. Above:as captain of the 1992 Crimson. Top right: asmember of the 1992 U.S. Olympic team.

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