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U.S. Security Adviser Speaks on Diplomacy

By David L. Bosco

American diplomacy will be ineffective if divorced from the threat of military action, National Security Adviser Anthony Lake '61 said in a speech yesterday.

Addressing 200 people in Yenching Auditorium, Lake pointed to the recent events in Haiti and Iraq as proof of the importance of American force. "At the heart of American power is the threat of force," Lake said. "Without it there would have been no progress in Haiti, no progress with Iraq."

In defense of U.S. readiness to use military action, Lake said the American military is "prepared to fight and win two major conflicts almost simultaneously."

Lake outlined seven causes for which the U.S. would commit troops. At the top of the list were the defense of American soil and nationals and the defense of allies against attack. Other causes Lake cited were resistance to aggression, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, defense of economic interests and humanitarian crises.

Lake also stressed the need for a national debate to further define American interests in the post Cold-War world. "You in this room have a central role to play in shaping this debate," he said.

Acknowledging current isolationist sentiments. Lake called on the U.S. to resist the tendency. "Today we again face the old impulses to retreat. Our interests demand that we check that impulse."

He compared the situation today to that of the 1920s during which the U.S. sought rest from overseas commitment and saw no immediate threat.

In response to questions, Lake outlined the recent agreement with North Korea, which he described as a "belluva deal."

He also addressed the Bosnian conflict and said the U.S. would put before the U.N. Security Council a motion to lift the arms embargo on the Bosnian Muslims. He cautioned, though, that "right now we don't have the votes."

Lake qualified his comments by nothing that President Clinton was giving a press conference at the same time. "If any of our statements are in conflict," Lake said, the "President is always right.

In response to questions, Lake outlined the recent agreement with North Korea, which he described as a "belluva deal."

He also addressed the Bosnian conflict and said the U.S. would put before the U.N. Security Council a motion to lift the arms embargo on the Bosnian Muslims. He cautioned, though, that "right now we don't have the votes."

Lake qualified his comments by nothing that President Clinton was giving a press conference at the same time. "If any of our statements are in conflict," Lake said, the "President is always right.

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