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Nye Setting Agenda for Return to Harvard

By Tara H. Arden-smith

Rabb Professor of Government Joseph S. Nye Jr. Only left for a government post in Washington, D.C. last year, but he's already setting an agenda for his return to Harvard next spring.

Nye took a two-year leave of absence from the University last spring when President Clinton appointed him to his second government position, chair of the National Intelligence Council.

Between 1977 and 1979 Nye served as Deputy Under-Secretary of State under President Jimmy Carter.

"My work now is always interesting, sometimes tiring and never dull," Nye said in a phone interview Sunday night.

But Nye also said he will leave Washington next spring and return to Harvard Full-time to resume his teaching responsibilities and offer new courses inspired by his stint in the Capital.

Nye said he will continue to teach Historical Studies A-12: International Conflict in the Modern World, a graduate course on American foreign politics at the Kennedy School of Government and A graduate course on ethics and international politics.

He Added, though, that he plans to organize a course for undergraduates on American foreign policy, first offering the potential lecture course on a smaller scale, such as a junior seminar in the Government Department.

"I'm learning useful things and I think the things I'm working on will affect my teaching at Harvard," he said. "I hope to introduce new topics and new angles into my lectures and provide additional information to students based on my education here."

Nye's work includes providing the President with "official intelligence estimates" in matters involving interaction between the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Department of State and the Department of Defense.

He said he works "12-hour days on every subject that appears on the front page of the newspaper," in addition to traveling with state officials.

Nye accompanied the President to a summit in Moscow in January, and, more recently, traveled to Beijing with Secretary of the Treasury Lloyd Bentsen. "It's a very heavy schedule," Nye said. "I've been so busy that I haven't really spent much time thinking about Harvard."

"But I'm looking forward to returning," he added. "Teaching and writing are appealing prospects right now."

Nye said his courses won't change drastically because his political outlook has remained fundamentally the same.

But he acknowledged that seeing governmentmechanisms up close has made him "more realisticabout what's politically feasible."

Gaining more outlook and different perspectivesare some of the benefits of professors takingleaves to pursue experiences outside theUniversity, Dean of the Faculty of Arts andSciences Jeremy R. Knowles said yesterday.

The University encourages faculty members toaccept government positions and even grants theman extension of the usual one-year leave ofabsence faculty members are allowed before losingtenure.

"Experiences in Washington for professors insuch fields as government and economics arewonderful for both the professor and for theUniversity," Knowles said.

I'm delighted that this experience will enrichProf. Nye's teaching and scholarship when hereturns home," he added.

Members of the Government Department also saidyesterday that they look forward to Nye's return,and especially to his new courses.

"I think [Nye's American foreign policy course]is a terrific idea, and this department will givehim every encouragement--we support him entirely,"said Reischauer Professor of Japanese PoliticsSusan J. Pharr, chair of the GovernmentDepartment.

"Joe Nye is a superb teacher and anything heteaches is a major contribution to our courseofferings," Pharr said.

She predicted that Nye's work in Washingtonwill "only expand his knowledge base."

"I can only imagine that this time inWashington will give [Nye's] lectures even morepunch and vividness," Pharr said. "But he'salready a superb teacher."

In fact, government concentrators yesterdaylamented the absence of Nye, saying that some arewaiting for his return before they take one of thedepartment's required introductory courses,Historical Studies A-12.

"I feel really lucky to have taken A-12 when Idid, when Nye was still here," said concentratorJoel J. Radtke '96. "He packed Sanders all thetime, and it was fun to go to lecture."

"I know several people who are waiting until hecomes back to take A-12," Radtke added.

Nye's absence has "put a crimp in some people'scurriculum," said Abid A. Saifee '96, anothergovernment concentrator.

Saifee also predicted that a junior seminartaught by Nye "would be packed."

"Nye is such a great lecturer and a great guy,but in a lecture-type class there's very littleopportunity for students to get to know him," headded.

But Saifee said he recognized the need for alecture class on American foreign policy."Especially now, when it's kind of been eclipsedin the news, having a class like that woulddefinitely be awesome," he said.

Echoing the words of knowles, Saifee says thetheory of international relations which Nye hasapplied in practice as a government official will"make for a great class."

"He'll probably bring an acute sense of howWashington works to any class he teaches now,"Saifee said

But he acknowledged that seeing governmentmechanisms up close has made him "more realisticabout what's politically feasible."

Gaining more outlook and different perspectivesare some of the benefits of professors takingleaves to pursue experiences outside theUniversity, Dean of the Faculty of Arts andSciences Jeremy R. Knowles said yesterday.

The University encourages faculty members toaccept government positions and even grants theman extension of the usual one-year leave ofabsence faculty members are allowed before losingtenure.

"Experiences in Washington for professors insuch fields as government and economics arewonderful for both the professor and for theUniversity," Knowles said.

I'm delighted that this experience will enrichProf. Nye's teaching and scholarship when hereturns home," he added.

Members of the Government Department also saidyesterday that they look forward to Nye's return,and especially to his new courses.

"I think [Nye's American foreign policy course]is a terrific idea, and this department will givehim every encouragement--we support him entirely,"said Reischauer Professor of Japanese PoliticsSusan J. Pharr, chair of the GovernmentDepartment.

"Joe Nye is a superb teacher and anything heteaches is a major contribution to our courseofferings," Pharr said.

She predicted that Nye's work in Washingtonwill "only expand his knowledge base."

"I can only imagine that this time inWashington will give [Nye's] lectures even morepunch and vividness," Pharr said. "But he'salready a superb teacher."

In fact, government concentrators yesterdaylamented the absence of Nye, saying that some arewaiting for his return before they take one of thedepartment's required introductory courses,Historical Studies A-12.

"I feel really lucky to have taken A-12 when Idid, when Nye was still here," said concentratorJoel J. Radtke '96. "He packed Sanders all thetime, and it was fun to go to lecture."

"I know several people who are waiting until hecomes back to take A-12," Radtke added.

Nye's absence has "put a crimp in some people'scurriculum," said Abid A. Saifee '96, anothergovernment concentrator.

Saifee also predicted that a junior seminartaught by Nye "would be packed."

"Nye is such a great lecturer and a great guy,but in a lecture-type class there's very littleopportunity for students to get to know him," headded.

But Saifee said he recognized the need for alecture class on American foreign policy."Especially now, when it's kind of been eclipsedin the news, having a class like that woulddefinitely be awesome," he said.

Echoing the words of knowles, Saifee says thetheory of international relations which Nye hasapplied in practice as a government official will"make for a great class."

"He'll probably bring an acute sense of howWashington works to any class he teaches now,"Saifee said

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