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Sharp Named New IOP Director

By Jonathan N. Axelrod

Philip R. Sharp, a 10-term Indiana Democrat defeated in last fall's Republican landslide, has been named director of the Kennedy School's Institute of Politics (IOP).

Sharp, 52, succeeds Charles Royer, a former mayor of Seattle who resigned the post in January. Sharp, who became a Kennedy School lecturer this semester, will officially take over July 1.

"I'm very excited and appreciative," Sharp said in an interview yesterday. "I hope to bring an appreciation of the values of politics in society and the importance of creative politics in our country to preserve basic liberties."

Sharp said he hopes to allow other schools to benefit more directly from IOP forums, perhaps through video tape libraries. He declined to reveal any further plans, noting that he has yet to meet with the IOP's Student Advisory Committee.

"I want to do the politically right thing and talk to the people who are involved before I talk about plans," Sharp said.

But the former congressional representative did outline some general aims.

"My first goal is to continue the success of the IOP and do no harm," he said. "I want to make sure we cov- er our three different levels. On top there'sthe philosophical debate, on the second level thepolicy arguments and finally the nuts and bolts ofthe policies."

A district including Muncie, Ind., sent Sharpto the House in 1974. On Capitol Hill, he gained areputation as an expert on environmental andenergy policy.

Sharp was one of the most powerful members ofthe House Natural Resources Committee. He wasinstrumental in the passage of President Carter'senergy plan, helped to write the Clean Air Act andengineered the passage of the Comprehensive EnergyPolicy of 1992.

He currently serves as chair of the EnergyBoard, a division of the not-for-profit Keystonecenter. Sharp also sits on the board of directorsof the Energy Foundation and the CINergycorporation.

Before entering politics, Sharp, who earned hisB.S. and Ph.D. from Georgetown, was an assistantprofessor of political science as Ball State.

Yesterday, students and officials praised theformer representative.

"Phil Sharp was one of the most thoughtful,substantive, and effective members of Congress,"Kennedy School Dean and Provost Albert Carnesalesaid in a statement. "He is well-respected bymembers of both parties for his intelligence,substantive expertise and bipartisan approach toissues."

Dillon Professor of Government, Emeritus,Richard E. Neustadt, who chaired the searchcommittee, said Sharp's "real world" perspectivewould enrich the IOP.

"A former and current educator with deeppolitical and legislative experience, Phil Sharpis ideal for the Institute of Politics," saidNeustadt, who was the founding director of theinstitute. "He embodies the bridge between theUniversity and the 'real world' of politics thatthe Institute seeks to explore. He was a veryaccomplished leader in the Congress, known for hisability to work with members on both sides of theaisle."

David V. Bonfili '96, a member of the studentsearch committee, said the new director'spolitical experience will be an asset.

"I think it's an excellent decision," Bonfilisaid. "Phil Sharp has an amazing amount ofexperience in national politics and he isrespected on both sides of the aisle. "He brings alot to the institution both in terms of experienceand putting undergraduates first"

Bonfili said he first met Sharp at a WashingtonD.C. airport. The former congressionalrepresentative recognized Bonfili from IOP eventsand introduced himself.

"It seems minor, but indicative of his interestin undergraduates," the student said.

In his new job, Sharp will oversee all theIOP's activities, including its resident fellowsprogram, student study groups, studentinternships, seminars for elected officials andthe Forum

A district including Muncie, Ind., sent Sharpto the House in 1974. On Capitol Hill, he gained areputation as an expert on environmental andenergy policy.

Sharp was one of the most powerful members ofthe House Natural Resources Committee. He wasinstrumental in the passage of President Carter'senergy plan, helped to write the Clean Air Act andengineered the passage of the Comprehensive EnergyPolicy of 1992.

He currently serves as chair of the EnergyBoard, a division of the not-for-profit Keystonecenter. Sharp also sits on the board of directorsof the Energy Foundation and the CINergycorporation.

Before entering politics, Sharp, who earned hisB.S. and Ph.D. from Georgetown, was an assistantprofessor of political science as Ball State.

Yesterday, students and officials praised theformer representative.

"Phil Sharp was one of the most thoughtful,substantive, and effective members of Congress,"Kennedy School Dean and Provost Albert Carnesalesaid in a statement. "He is well-respected bymembers of both parties for his intelligence,substantive expertise and bipartisan approach toissues."

Dillon Professor of Government, Emeritus,Richard E. Neustadt, who chaired the searchcommittee, said Sharp's "real world" perspectivewould enrich the IOP.

"A former and current educator with deeppolitical and legislative experience, Phil Sharpis ideal for the Institute of Politics," saidNeustadt, who was the founding director of theinstitute. "He embodies the bridge between theUniversity and the 'real world' of politics thatthe Institute seeks to explore. He was a veryaccomplished leader in the Congress, known for hisability to work with members on both sides of theaisle."

David V. Bonfili '96, a member of the studentsearch committee, said the new director'spolitical experience will be an asset.

"I think it's an excellent decision," Bonfilisaid. "Phil Sharp has an amazing amount ofexperience in national politics and he isrespected on both sides of the aisle. "He brings alot to the institution both in terms of experienceand putting undergraduates first"

Bonfili said he first met Sharp at a WashingtonD.C. airport. The former congressionalrepresentative recognized Bonfili from IOP eventsand introduced himself.

"It seems minor, but indicative of his interestin undergraduates," the student said.

In his new job, Sharp will oversee all theIOP's activities, including its resident fellowsprogram, student study groups, studentinternships, seminars for elected officials andthe Forum

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