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Dole to Give HBS Class Day Speech

By Vasugi V. Ganeshanathan, CRIMSON STAFF WRITER

Republican presidential hopeful Elizabeth H. Dole will dust off her pearls of wisdom for the graduating class of the Harvard Business School (HBS).

Dole, who offered the Class Day address to graduates of the Kennedy School of Government last June, returns to Boston June 9 for HBS Class Day ceremonies U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher will address the Harvard Medical School (HMS) the following day.

Dole, who graduated from Harvard Law School (HLS) in 1965, was one of the first women to attend HLS. She was president of the American Red Cross from 1991 until this January, when she resigned to explore the possibility of running for the presidency as the Republican candidate in 2000.

Mandee J. Heller, chair of the HBS Class Day Committee, said it was Dole's experience in the business world, not her political aspirations, that spurred her selection.

"She was invited because of her accomplishments with the American Red Cross and her overall achievements in the public sector," Heller said.

Before her tenure with the Red Cross, Dole served in the administrations of five presidents, twice as a cabinet member. She was president George Bush's Secretary of Labor from 1989-1991 and was the first woman to serve as Secretary of Transportation, in president Ronald Regan's cabinet from 1983-87.

From 1973 to 1979, Dole was a member of the Federal Trade Commission. Between 1971 and 1973 she worked as President Nixon's Deputy Assistant for Consumer Affairs.

Graduating HBS student Kevin W. Walbrick said he thought Dole was a good choice for Class Day speaker.

"I think she'll be able to speak to a broad range of people. That's based on the kind of person that she is. She's not a far right-wing Republican...she won't alienate people," Walbrick said.

"She's had a broad base of leadership opportunities within public institutions so I think she commands the 1respect that is necessary to deliver that kindof speech," he added.

Satcher, who is the 16th Surgeon General, isalso the assistant secretary of health and hasserved in these positions since February 1998. Theassistant secretary for health advises the healthand human services secretary's senior adviser onpublic health issues. Satcher was president ofMeharry Medical College from 1982 until 1993. From1993 to 1997, he was the director of the Centerfor Disease Control and Prevention

Satcher, who is the 16th Surgeon General, isalso the assistant secretary of health and hasserved in these positions since February 1998. Theassistant secretary for health advises the healthand human services secretary's senior adviser onpublic health issues. Satcher was president ofMeharry Medical College from 1982 until 1993. From1993 to 1997, he was the director of the Centerfor Disease Control and Prevention

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