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Sonia F. Epstein

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Martin Kilson
Af Am Department

Martin Kilson, First Tenured African American Professor at Harvard, Dies at 88

Government Professor Emeritus Martin L. Kilson, Jr., the first African American to receive full tenure at Harvard, died in hospice on April 24 of congestive heart failure at the age of 88.

Congressional Orientation Header
Scrutiny

Congressional Disorientation

The story of fresh-faced idealism, jockeyed against the cynicism of established old-timers, is not new, or even surprising. But last December, social media amplified the protests of a small group of new members who criticized the corporate, establishment nature of the IOP’s orientation.

Literature of Social Reflection Course
Retrospection

The Literature Class Bigger Than CS50

Harvard has experienced a recent decline in English and humanities concentrators, a trend mirrored nationwide. So what made this particular literature class such a staple of the course catalog, some thirty years ago? And what might its absence suggest about the changing nature of literature classes on campus?

Roderick MacFarquhar
Government

Roderick MacFarquhar, Prolific Author and Professor of Chinese History, Dies at 88

He was renowned for his close study of Chinese communism, died of heart failure on Feb. 10 at the age of 88. He was one of the leading scholars on the Chinese Cultural Revolution and served in multiple leadership positions at the University.

Harvard Business School
Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School Professor Emeritus Hank Reiling Dies at 80

Harvard Business School Professor Emeritus Henry “Hank” B. Reiling, a specialist in finance, taxation, and law and an influential educator, died on Jan. 21 in Belmont, Mass., at the age of 80. Reiling served as a professor of business administration at the Business School from 1978 until he retired in 2005.

Roy Glauber
FAS

Roy Glauber, Harvard Physics Professor and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 93

Harvard Physics Professor Emeritus Roy J. Glauber ’46, whose pioneering work in the field of quantum optics earned him a Nobel Prize in 2005, died on Dec. 26. He was 93.

Concentrators Data
Government

Amid Decline in Popularity, Harvard Government Department Turns to New Data and Tech Programs

Harvard's Government department hopes that two new tracks — in Tech Science and Data Science — will not only widen the scope of what affiliated students study, but offer an antidote to the field's diminished popularity.

Langdell Hall
College

UC Berkeley Sociologist Talks History of Harvard Admissions

Jerome B. Karabel ’72 has written widely about the history of race-conscious admissions at elite universities.

Meredith Rosenthal
School of Public Health

School of Public Health Professor to Direct Advanced Leadership Initiative

Meredith B. Rosenthal, a professor of health economics and policy at the School of Public Health, will direct the Advanced Leadership Initiative starting January 2019.

Miss Radcliffe Finalists
Retrospection

The Radcliffe Club of San Francisco is not Extinct

We don’t have as many young people in our club as we’d like. Nonetheless we’re pleased that we’re still here. So we’ll stay for now, as Radcliffe girls, together.

Endpaper Mice
House Life

In Case You Forget

Under the vaulted ceilings of that old, old space, we danced onwards, understanding that we were still so very young and so very new to this place.

Harvard Wives
Retrospection

Harvard Wives' Tales

Lecture topics for the Society of Harvard Dames evolved over the twentieth century. In 1925, Miss Alice Bradley spoke on “Intelligent Housekeeping.” In 1951, the wives were “fascinated and delighted to hear” Harvard architecture professor Jean P. Carlhian weigh in on the subject, “Can Mrs. Blandings Build her Dream House?”

Marlyn E. McGrath '70
College

Harry, Marlyn, and Harvard: A 50-Year Marriage

Harvard has undergone decades of change—and Lewis and McGrath have been around to see it. Both have stayed in Cambridge and, in many ways, become campus institutions.

Miss Radcliffe Finalists
Retrospection

When the Crimson Ran a Beauty Pageant

During the years of the contest, Crimson photographers would scout out Miss Radcliffe candidates at the early fall dances, inviting 25 to 30 semifinalists to attend a dinner where the girls’ looks and manners were assessed. The Crimeds narrowed this group down to a cohort of six finalists, who were judged by editors, faculty members, fashion experts, and in 1953, even Miss United States.

Porter Square Books Owner
Around Town

The Indies: Threatened, But Thriving

On one side stands Amazon—vast, convenient, and cheap. On the other side stands small bookstores, promoting what Ryan L. Raffaelli, a Harvard Business School professor studying the industry, calls “the 3 C’s”: community, convening, and curation.

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