Contributing writer

Kaivan K. Shroff

Latest Content


HKS is Harvard’s Theranos

Local governments hire HKS alumni expecting that the MPP credential holds a certain merit. In reality, from my experience, most students come from dissimilar academic backgrounds compared to adjacent graduate programs, complete AP-level coursework, and get rubber-stamped as policy leaders for completing a program where anything below a B- is failing — and, to my knowledge, almost nobody fails. As we experience a global leadership crisis, it’s important the public not rely on Harvard’s MPP program until the school commits to higher standards of vetting and rigor.


The Cognitive Dissonance of Grad School Truth-telling

In my experience, as someone who has spent half a decade in such programs, those pursuing a professional degree program consider their degree, at least in part, through a return-on-investment lens. If a graduate degree is an asset, intuitively, you don’t devalue your own asset. In a world where brand names matter, it behooves students and alumni to ensure their school remains in high regard. Spilling dirty little secrets will not serve professional graduates in the long-run. It signals to future employers that you might do the same to them — if they hire you. Even your classmates and future colleagues may take offense to you criticizing the program they’ve just invested in.


Harvard Alumni Have Powered the Trump Administration

Harvard’s silence on graduates as recent as 2016 using their Harvard degrees to wage a full-fledged assault on the truth is unworthy of the University’s own “Veritas” motto.


Wearing A Mask that Reveals Too Much

In a pandemic of loneliness as the safeguards of our democracy fail, my Biden mask, like the MAGA hat, reveals that I too am in a cult.


Update Available: Rethinking Tech in Class

We are adults, in our twenties, at an elite graduate school program, paying for education — it’s our time. To be regulated on our access to technology, including to the outside world, is reductive and juvenile.


Close Harvard on Election Day

If Harvard gives its nearly 40,000 community members Election Day off this year, studies the impact of the decision, and starts to build a movement, our society will be better off.