Ivy League Schools Hold Anti-War Marches, Rallies

Moratorium participation was high at other Ivy League schools, with very few classes held and large numbers turning out for anti-war rallies.

At Yale, an unexpected 50,000 gathered at noon at the New Haven Green to hear speeches by Rep. Allard Lowenstein (D.N.Y.); Rev. Joseph Duffy, president of the A.D.A.; New Haven Mayor Richard C. Lee, former Secretary of Interior Stuart Udall, who is currently professor at the Yale Forestry School; President Kingman Brewster; and Rev. William Sloan Coffin. Brewster, who has been a vocal opponent of the war, told the crowd. "Let us be more honest in the pursuit of peace than we have been in the pursuit of war."

Sen. Harold Hughes (D-Iowa) appeared at a teach-in at Princeton Tuesday night along with Carl Davidson, former national chairman of SDS. A rally yesterday attended by 1000 to 1500 featured Susan Sontag. Lowenstein, and Rep. Frank Thompson (D-N.J.) Last night a candlelight service was held for the war dead on the steps of the State Capital in Trenton. University employees were allowed the day off with pay.

A campus-wide assembly at the University of Pennsylvania, called by the Provost of the University, was attended by 2500 students and faculty, who called for immediate withdrawal of all U.S. forces in Vietnam. The assembly was followed by a march to the J.F.K. Plaza in downtown Philadelphia, where 50,000 gathered. Noam Chomsky was the principle speaker.

A large rally was held in the Arts Quad at Cornell's campus. About three-quarters of the faculty canceled their lectures, and a handful of students turned up for the others.

At Brown, about 5000 students turnedout to hear Peter B. Adelman, former associate of Robert F. Kennedy, Tuesday night. Last night, a large crowd of students heard Harvard's Edwin O. Reischauer, Jerome Weisman, provost of M.I.T., and Gov. Frank Licht of Rhode Island. Nearly all classes were cancelled.

A peaceful rally of about 5000 took place at the Columbia campus. Nearly all classes were canceled, and many students went to Bryant Park, where an anti-war rally drew almost as many as the Boston Common gathering.

In Massachusetts, 300 welfare demonstrators, including Wade Rathke, the western Massachusetts organizer of the Welfare Rights Organization, sat in at the Springfield welfare office after an anti-war march. As the police moved demonstrators from the welfare office, youths threw bottles, bricks, and rocks at them.

Edwin O. Reischauer, former ambassador to Japan and on leave from Harvard, spoke at Belmont High School and urged a two-year, two-stage withdrawal from Vietnam.

About 200 faculty and students at Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill gave blood "to save the life of a G.I."

Police in Somerville intervened as six boys tried to haul down an American flag in front of Somerville High School.

In Pittsfield, unknown persons set fire to the local draft board offices, destroying a number of Selective Service records. The state fire marshal's office and the FBI were called in to head an investigation of the blaze.

Elsewhere in New England, 4000 gathered in Burlington. Vt., to hear former Governor Philip H. Hoff and Lt. Gov. Thomas Hayes denounce the war. The two men also made speeches at Bennington College.