Crimson staff writer

Oliver L. Riskin-Kutz

Latest Content


Monks, Merchants, Samaritans, Spies: A Story About The Harvard Crimson, a Cambodian Temple, a Trappist Monastery, and a New Delhi Satellite City

Every article that has ever appeared in The Crimson’s pages, going back to the paper’s founding in 1873, is online — not scanned, but fully typed. Anyone who cares to look can find the results of the Harvard-Yale game of 1887, for example, simply by searching for it on The Crimson’s website. It took a concerted effort for those past editions to be put online. But nobody seemed to remember anymore exactly how or when that effort had taken place. Had it really been monks? No one could tell me.


Harvard Libraries Closed In-Person Services This Week. Here’s What You Need to Know About Doing Research This Semester.

In response to the spread of the novel coronavirus, Harvard library locations closed all print services Monday, but some remote services and digital resources remain online. With the spring semester starting up again this Monday, here’s what you need to know about using Harvard’s libraries.


Harvard Digitizes Colonial North America Archives

A decade-long project to digitize every 17th- and 18th- century manuscript and archive in Harvard’s collections relating to North America will be finished this semester, according to University Archivist Megan Sniffin-Marinoff.


Peabody Director Proposes Increasing Public Access to Slave Photos at Center of Lawsuit

The Faculty Executive Committee of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology will develop initiatives to increase public access to a set of historic photographs of enslaved people at the center of a lawsuit against Harvard, according to an email museum director Jane Pickering sent to the Committee.