Crimson staff writer

Josie F. Abugov

Associate Editor Josie F. Abugov can be reached at josie.abugov@thecrimson.com.

Latest Content


Twenty Minutes in My Empty Mind

Over the past year, during the months living in my childhood bedroom, I often found myself taking aimless drives – canyon, freeway, shortcut to nowhere – discovering and rediscovering my favorite music. It is the only place where a spontaneous two-hour drive feels less like a chore and more like a gift.


The Sky's the Limit for Asa Akira

Whether porn reflects existing racial stereotypes or creates a monster of its own is a classic chicken-or-the-egg question. Porn and racism, most likely, engender a mutually reinforcing cycle. But Akira’s individual responsibility within this cycle is, at most, ambiguous.


In the Weeds

In 2018, Massachusetts created a program to support cannabis entrepreneurs whose businesses will benefit communities disproportionately affected by the War on Drugs. Bitter disputes over the policy's implementation in Cambridge have since raised questions about what, exactly, equity and reparations should look like.


"Are We In The Minority?"

When a group of Black Harvard students founded the Generational African American Students Association, they created a new label for an old identity. But the act of naming has raised a host of difficult questions about representation within elite spaces, access to the resources they provide, and the efficacy of promoting marginalized groups within them. And advocating for Generational African American Students carries a fraught undercurrent — a tension between specificity and solidarity, a risk of pitting one marginalized group against another.


A New Kind of Porn is Coming

In audio porn, there’s something symbolic about being directly addressed as you, specifically, are guided to your climax. For all intents and purposes, you’re the main character — regardless of the dynamics in the story.


In Transition

When Sarah E. Gyorog first heard about Massachusetts’ stay-at-home order, she immediately thought, “but home isn’t safe for everybody.” As the executive director of Transition House, Cambridge’s sole domestic violence shelter, she knew that the order could pose increased risk for survivors.