Anthropology


Jury Could Hear Former Associate Professor’s Gender Discrimination Suit Against Harvard, Judge Says

A lawsuit brought by former Harvard Associate Professor Kimberly S. Theidon alleging the University unfairly denied her tenure could be headed to trial after a federal judge said at an appeal hearing Wednesday that the case may be better left to a jury.


Court Dismisses Gender Discrimination Lawsuit Against Harvard

A federal judge ruled last month that former associate professor Kimberly S. Theidon failed to prove Harvard violated Title IX policies in denying her tenure.


Mary Steedly, Cornerstone of Anthropology Department, Dies at 71

Steedly, remembered for her eloquent writing, unfussy demeanor, institutional dedication, and passion for dogs, died on Jan. 4 due to breast cancer. She was 71.


Under the Wall

Ieva Jusionyte, an associate professor of anthropology, talks about the politics of security on the U.S./ Mexican border, and how border security and first responders deal with threats and hazards that cross borders.


Anthropology Department Urges Faust to Designate Harvard a Sanctuary Campus

In an email, members of the Anthropology Department called on University president Drew G. Faust and other Harvard administrators to protect undocumented students by designating Harvard a sanctuary campus.


Smashing Agassiz’s Boulder

Joseph L. Graves discusses the legacies of former Harvard professor Louis Agassiz and Charles Darwin’s legacies in Northwest Labs Tuesday night. The talk was part of a speaker series put on by the Peabody Museum for their 150th anniversary.


Dominance of Western Perspectives Troubles the Social Sciences

American and Western European foci and schools of thought continue to dominate social science fields at Harvard, frustrating some students and faculty even as other perspectives and methods grow.


Court Declines Motion to Protect Names in Tenure Denial Case

An ongoing lawsuit that alleges Harvard discriminated against a former associate professor on the basis of gender has now provoked a broader dispute about the confidentiality of the University’​s tenure process.


Harvard Weissman's Conservators Protect Objects of the Past

IN Touch With History: On a dreary afternoon, a conservator fills in the cracked colors of a centuries-old illuminated manuscript. Down the aisle, the personal photo album of an African royal family is restored before it is destroyed by time. At Harvard’s Weissman Preservation Center, conservators connect with stories of the past through the artifacts they touch.


Professors Support Resolution To Boycott Israeli Institutions

Twenty-one Harvard faculty and graduate students have voted or signed a petition to place a resolution to boycott Israeli academic institutions on the American Anthropological Association’s spring ballot.


Families Interact with Ancient Artifacts at Archaeology Fair

Ancient Mayan teeth and a mummified crocodile were among the artifacts featured at the Peabody Museum’s Amazing Archaeology Fair on Saturday.


Changing the Channel

Athena P. Bowe ’15 presents her senior thesis in Quincy House on Wednesday evening entitled, “Changing the Channel: A Study of Audience Reception and Identity Formation of University Students in Shanghai.”


Changing Channels

Athena P. Bowe ’15 presents her senior thesis in Quincy House on Wednesday evening entitled, “Changing the Channel: A Study of Audience Reception and Identity Formation of University Students in Shanghai.”


Former Professor Files Federal Lawsuit in Response to Tenure Denial

The complaint—which names Harvard and the Harvard Corporation as defendants—reiterates several allegations that Harvard’s decision to deny her tenure violated federal anti-sex discrimination law Title IX.


Anthropology Professor Named Changjiang Scholar

The title of Changjiang Scholar is often considered the most prestigious academic award conferred in China, and is rarely granted to foreigners or to social scientists.


More Remnants of Indian College in Yard Emerge

After discovering the foundation of the Indian College in previous digs, students said that the discovery of a “clay cap” basement structure could shed new light on life at the school, which was erected in 1655 and dismantled in 1698.


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